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05

Apr

corvidblog:

(via Ravens at Wellesley | Wellesley College)
RAVEN CAM GUYS RAVEN CAM RAAAAVEN CAAAAAMMM!!!
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!
:D :D :D :D :D :D :D

corvidblog:

(via Ravens at Wellesley | Wellesley College)

RAVEN CAM GUYS RAVEN CAM RAAAAVEN CAAAAAMMM!!!

AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!

:D :D :D :D :D :D :D

03

Apr

arpeggia:

Masahisa Fukase - The Solitude of Ravens, 1970s-1980s

Click on each image for more details.

"Masahisa Fukase was born in Hokkaido, Japan in 1934. In 1952 he enrolled in the Photography Department of Nihon University in Tokyo. After graduation in 1956 he was hired at Dai-Ichi Advertising Company, where he began working as a commercial photographer while he pursued his artistic career. Two solo exhibitions followed in quick succession. 1974 marked several important events in Fukase’s life. He established a photography school called The Workshop with his colleagues Shomei Tomatsu, Eiko Hosoe, Noriaki Yokosuka, Daido Moriyama and Nobuyoshi Araki. The same year, his work was included in the exhibition New Japanese Photography at the Museum of Modern Art, curated by John Szarkowski and Shoji Yamagishi. Despite these professional accomplishments, his unstable marriage of the past ten years had begun to dissolve; he returned to his birthplace of Hokkaido seeking solace. At this time, Fukase began to photograph the black birds that would become emblematic of his finest work. Sadly, on June 20, 1992 a severe accident prematurely ended Fukase’s artistic career. Although he was among a generation of young Japanese artists struggling with the constraints of their society, Fukase strayed from the cultural concerns and nihilistic expressionism of his colleagues, focusing instead on a deeply personal meditation on human existence. The somber beauty of his raven photographs reflect his lonely, troubled life and reveal his appreciation of the defiant isolation of these creatures.” [Robert Mann Gallery]

Image source: Robert Mann Gallery, Photo Tractatus

22

Mar

This is lovely. Via iheartcrows:

"RAVEN STUDY" by Michael Pape

This is lovely. Via iheartcrows:

"RAVEN STUDY" by Michael Pape

21

Jan

Hello, pretty bird. 
fairy-wren:

common raven
(photo by ritta mi)

Hello, pretty bird. 

fairy-wren:

common raven

(photo by ritta mi)

15

Jan

kaisergeiser:

Quoth the raven,
BRUSHIE BRUSHIE.

BRUSHIE BRUSHIE BRUSHIE. Also, the fact that there are people asking if this should be tagged as #gothgoth makes me cackle delightedly. 

kaisergeiser:

Quoth the raven,

BRUSHIE BRUSHIE.

BRUSHIE BRUSHIE BRUSHIE. Also, the fact that there are people asking if this should be tagged as #gothgoth makes me cackle delightedly. 

(Source: a-p-p-e-t-e-n-c-e)

19

Dec

Oh, these are lovely images. Hello, pretty ravens.

(Source: daarnautova)

29

Sep

victoriousvocabulary:

CORVOPHILIA

[noun]

a love of crows or ravens.

[Jeremy Hush]

18

Jul

Know your corvids.

elfentau:

~* Ravens * Crows * Blackbirds *~

05

Jun

Ravens. And desk supplies. 

theblacklacedandy:

cosmosonic:

 A raven typing his own name of on the typewriter, 1939

BABIES

(Source: cosmosonic)

14

Apr

Ravens! Via yukadelavega: Raven smootchies. 

Source: Canislupuscorax & DeeOtter

04

Apr

gothfoxdesigns:

birdworlds:

Owning a Raven is a lot of work, in America African Ravens & crows are legal to own. I’ve interacted with companion ravens before and they are fantastic. Seeing this incredible bird free flying and playing in the air while knowing he is keeping his eye on us and will come back.

Oh Jilli I see your next pet in the future. ;)

YES. Here birdie, birdie, birdie.

26

Mar

I have no idea what this is from, but the imagery is beautiful. 
fuckyeahseoulsisters:

face your greatest fears.

I have no idea what this is from, but the imagery is beautiful. 

fuckyeahseoulsisters:

face your greatest fears.

18

Feb

gothtriggers:

If when the Raven refused to leave the bust above your door; you accessorized accordingly…

(Source: fetishmode)

24

Jan

Hello birdies. 

cybersphynx:

Ravens! Lots of ravens.

15

Jan

mortisia:

The name “crow” is used for an entire family of birds, Corvidae, that includes the raven species. To put it simply, all ravens are crows; but crows can also be jays, magpies, or other birds. The terms “crow” and “raven” are actually very general, and can be used to refer to a number of different related birds in the Corvus genus.

The most noticeable difference between a crow and a raven is size; in most cases, the largest black birds in this genus are known as ravens. These two types of birds can also have some differences in their feathers. Both are iridescent black, although a crow’s older feathers are often lighter. A raven’s feathers shine with a blue or purple tint when the sun hits them. One of the most interesting differences between the two birds is in their vocalizations. A crow’s voice is often considered annoying and repetitive. A raven’s voice is more varied, however, and it’s able to imitate other birds and animals. Its most distinctive noise is a deep, croaking sound, which is often considered more musical than the call of the crow.

Crows are tolerant of noisy, populated areas with people and other animals. Ravens like privacy in their solitary hunt for insects, fruits, and carrion, so they’re more likely to be found in remote woods, meadows, and hills.